Pop Out – 3D Art

The term “3D art” can be used in several different ways. From the sense of depth sought by early artists in paintings to sculptures, statues, and art installations, we’ve created a thumbnail guide to the various modes covered by this term.

3D Effects

Perspective and dimension are important aspects of art and over the years artists have come up with many different ways to achieve a sense of depth in their works. Occlusion (painting or drawing one thing over another, as if in front of it) and shadows are both great ways to achieve a 3D effect. Forced-perspective art is a good example of how these techniques can be used to manipulate visual perception. By tweaking elements like the view in relation to the objects being viewed, the perception of the scale can be altered drastically.

Digital Dimensions

Although digital media was unheard of until the 1980s, the strides it has taken since has meant that the term “Digital Media” is now an umbrella term that can be used to describe any art that is made or presented using digital technology. This means that while some projects are entirely digital, others can use digital means to manipulate traditional art forms. Holograms are an early example of how digital media helped to create 3D art. Using many images taken from various angles of a single object, these objects could appear to be given three-dimension within the presented medium. This technique has now been expanded upon so much that many of the digitally animated movies popular today are created using evolved variations of those original holographic techniques.

Sculptures, Statues and Installations

If the appearance of three dimensions is not enough for you, sculptures, statues, and installations provide the real deal; art in three dimensions. Coming in all shapes and sizes, sculptures and statues, which were original works of wood, stone, metals, and clay, can now also be made of almost anything. Food, recycled waste, organic materials, paper, books, and bones are just a few of the more unusual materials artists have used to create some truly inspired and thought-provoking works. Installations are 3 dimensional by nature and tend to be site-specific but are more all-encompassing than other forms allow for, as the installation can use the entirety of the space that it is housed in.